Race-work, Race-love

Aug 13

#Ecuador #EcuadorAppreciationMonth:

I wrote this in 2010 but it speaks to me today. Recent events make me reflect on the historical struggle for justice - and how if we are not careful- people will write a story that will cause us to hate our own. 
The Ecuadorian Massacre of 1922 - or - #LasCrucesSobreElAgua - is one of those stories. The government reports that only 100 were killed on November 15, 1922. But other sources cite over 1500 people were killed that day. 
La Lucha continues… #KnowYourHistory #BeEmboldenedByYourHistory #OurAncestorsGotOurBacks

#Ecuador #EcuadorAppreciationMonth:

I wrote this in 2010 but it speaks to me today. Recent events make me reflect on the historical struggle for justice - and how if we are not careful- people will write a story that will cause us to hate our own.
The Ecuadorian Massacre of 1922 - or - #LasCrucesSobreElAgua - is one of those stories. The government reports that only 100 were killed on November 15, 1922. But other sources cite over 1500 people were killed that day.
La Lucha continues… #KnowYourHistory #BeEmboldenedByYourHistory #OurAncestorsGotOurBacks

Aug 12

#PrimerGritoDeIndependencia #Ecuador. #DiezDeAgosto

August 10th, 1809 marks the first battle cry for independence from Spain in Ecuador. The battle was not successful - Ecuador gained independence many years later. But even then, slavery was not abolished (1852) even when Ecuador gained independence from Spain (1822) and from Gran Colombia (1830). So when I think about independence days, I always wonder - independence for who? 
Every cry for freedom is important - but we must be willing to fight for everyone’s freedom. Everyone. 
Happy Ecuador Appreciation Month!

#PrimerGritoDeIndependencia #Ecuador. #DiezDeAgosto

August 10th, 1809 marks the first battle cry for independence from Spain in Ecuador. The battle was not successful - Ecuador gained independence many years later. But even then, slavery was not abolished (1852) even when Ecuador gained independence from Spain (1822) and from Gran Colombia (1830). So when I think about independence days, I always wonder - independence for who?
Every cry for freedom is important - but we must be willing to fight for everyone’s freedom. Everyone.
Happy Ecuador Appreciation Month!

Aug 07

[video]

#AdrianSanchezGalque #Ecuador #Esmeraldas #Zambos #Zambita

This painting “Mulatos de Esmeraldas” (1599) and the story behind it means a great deal to me. Growing up Ecuadorian for me meant being called “Zambita” my whole life. I didn’t know what that meant but I did know that the first time I was called Zambita I was immediately racialized. As a little girl, I remember looking up the word “sambo” and read that it was a derogatory term. Only recently did I learn about the Zambos - an Ecuadorian group of people made up of African and Indigenous blood lines - and it all made sense (Thank you, Dash Harris). I always identified as AfroIndigena - and now I know where Zambita (where I) comes from. Sadly, it is reported that Zambo chieftains pledged their loyalty to the Spaniards in Quito - which probably led to their disempowerment. For more, please google “Mulatos de Esmeraldas” and read the excerpt below. 


“Regional blackness as a force of self-liberation in Ecuador begins in Esmeraldas, and its origin occurs during a violent tropical storm and a movement of African rebellion. The documented history of Ecuador establishes the beginnings of Afro-Hispanic culture in what is now Esmeraldas, Ecuador, where a Spanish slaving ship ran aground in 1553. There a group of twenty-three Africans from the coast of Guinea, led by a black warrior named Antón, attacked the slavers and liberated themselves. Not long after, this group, together with other blacks entering the region, led by a ladino (Hispanicized black person) named Alonso de Illescas, came to dominate the region from northern Manabí north to what is now Barbacoas, Colombia…By 1599 black people were clearly in charge of what was called “La República de Zambos” or “Zambo Republic”. Zambo refers to people of colour who are descendants of Native Americans and African-Americans.” Source: No Longer Invisible: Afro-Latin Americans Today. Minority Rights Group, ed. Minority Rights Publications, 1995, pp. 291-292.

#AdrianSanchezGalque #Ecuador #Esmeraldas #Zambos #Zambita

This painting “Mulatos de Esmeraldas” (1599) and the story behind it means a great deal to me. Growing up Ecuadorian for me meant being called “Zambita” my whole life. I didn’t know what that meant but I did know that the first time I was called Zambita I was immediately racialized. As a little girl, I remember looking up the word “sambo” and read that it was a derogatory term. Only recently did I learn about the Zambos - an Ecuadorian group of people made up of African and Indigenous blood lines - and it all made sense (Thank you, Dash Harris). I always identified as AfroIndigena - and now I know where Zambita (where I) comes from. Sadly, it is reported that Zambo chieftains pledged their loyalty to the Spaniards in Quito - which probably led to their disempowerment. For more, please google “Mulatos de Esmeraldas” and read the excerpt below. “Regional blackness as a force of self-liberation in Ecuador begins in Esmeraldas, and its origin occurs during a violent tropical storm and a movement of African rebellion. The documented history of Ecuador establishes the beginnings of Afro-Hispanic culture in what is now Esmeraldas, Ecuador, where a Spanish slaving ship ran aground in 1553. There a group of twenty-three Africans from the coast of Guinea, led by a black warrior named Antón, attacked the slavers and liberated themselves. Not long after, this group, together with other blacks entering the region, led by a ladino (Hispanicized black person) named Alonso de Illescas, came to dominate the region from northern Manabí north to what is now Barbacoas, Colombia…By 1599 black people were clearly in charge of what was called “La República de Zambos” or “Zambo Republic”. Zambo refers to people of colour who are descendants of Native Americans and African-Americans.” Source: No Longer Invisible: Afro-Latin Americans Today. Minority Rights Group, ed. Minority Rights Publications, 1995, pp. 291-292.

Aug 06

#ManuelaSaenz #Ecuador: Today’s post is dedicated to Manuela Saenz, Ecuadorian woman from Quito, also known as “La Libertadora del Libertador”. She is given this description because she helped Simon Bolivar strategize his battles against Spain and also saved his life on numerous occasions. She was truly a ride or die partner - lover, colleague, and friend. 
What I love about this freedom  fighter is her story - we often only hear or read about one side of warriors - and never hear/read about how they manage love and heartbreak. To me she is complete  because her story demonstrates the ability to manage both a lover and a fighter’s heart.

I hope to learn more about her and Maria Chiquinquira as they have certainly captured THIS Ecuadorian warrior’s heart ❤️ Happy Ecuador Appreciation Month!

#ManuelaSaenz #Ecuador: Today’s post is dedicated to Manuela Saenz, Ecuadorian woman from Quito, also known as “La Libertadora del Libertador”. She is given this description because she helped Simon Bolivar strategize his battles against Spain and also saved his life on numerous occasions. She was truly a ride or die partner - lover, colleague, and friend.
What I love about this freedom fighter is her story - we often only hear or read about one side of warriors - and never hear/read about how they manage love and heartbreak. To me she is complete because her story demonstrates the ability to manage both a lover and a fighter’s heart.

I hope to learn more about her and Maria Chiquinquira as they have certainly captured THIS Ecuadorian warrior’s heart ❤️ Happy Ecuador Appreciation Month!

Jul 02

Measuring Colleges’ Access and Diversity Efforts – Head Count - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Arizona State offers support for body-slammed professor, but university denies any shift @insidehighered

Jul 01

Professor Slammed to the Ground for Jaywalking Speaks Out

ASU Professor Slammed To The Ground By Police, Gets Arrested For Assaulting An Officer (VIDEO)

Dr Ersula Ore MASJHR Statement - Pastebin.com